points

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Definitions by Wordnik

  1. (noun) Plural form of point.
  2. (noun) Movable rails which can be used to switch a train from one railway track to another.
  3. (noun) The two metal surfaces in a distributor which close or open to allow current to flow or not through the ignition coil. Each surface is called a point singular (there's usually a moving point which is pushed by the distributor cam and a fixed point which isn't), but they're made together in a unit and serviced or replaced that way and are hence normally called points plural.
  4. (verb) Third-person singular simple present indicative form of point.

Examples by Wordnik

  1. Just to give one example: he accepts something like a coloured picture, with all the different colour points, traveling in parallel up the optic nerve and has to concern himself with how many colour ˜points™ could travel in parallel in a single nerve (Czolbe 1855: 33). - Friedrich Albert Lange
  2. The crossing points are called “nodal points”, the closed sections between the nodal points a “mesh” and each part of the line “mesh line”. - 4. Power transmission and distribution in power supply systems
  3. In blazon a Label is supposed to have three points; but, if more, the number is to be specified; thus, No. 271 is simply “a Label,” but No. 272 is “a Label of five points.” - The Handbook to English Heraldry
  4. Ultra-Chartists, 'Danes' as they were then called, coming into his territory with their 'five points,' or rather with their five-and-twenty thousand points and edges too, of pikes namely and battle-axes; and proposing mere Heathenism, confiscation, spoliation, and fire and sword, -- Edmund answered that he would oppose to the utmost such savagery. - Past and Present Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII.
  5. Chartists, 'Danes' as they were then called, coming into his territory with their 'five points,' or rather with their five - and-twenty thousand points and edges too, of pikes namely and battleaxes; and proposing mere Heathenism, confiscation, spoliation, and fire and sword, -- Edmund answered that he would oppose to the utmost such savagery. - Past and Present

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